Posts Tagged ‘lost wallet’

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Let us sit down and be patient.

November 30, 2011

“Let us rise up and be thankful, for if we didn’t learn a lot today, at least we learned a little, and if we didn’t learn a little, at least we didn’t get sick, and if we got sick, at least we didn’t die; so, let us all be thankful.” Buddha

“Let us sit down and be patient, for if you didn’t get a formal police report, at least you can still take time out of your busy schedule to file one, and if your student ID was in your wallet when you lost it, at least you can use your passport for identification, and if you can’t replace your student ID for free without a formal police report, at least you can pay 60 NIS for one, and if your credit cards were in your wallet when you lost it, at least you can cancel them and wait two to three weeks for replacements to come to Israel and have to borrow money from your friends in the meantime.” Carlo

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Israel did not steal my wallet.

November 26, 2011

I take full responsibility for having lost my wallet. Perhaps I was careless about which pocket to put it in or where on my body I was carrying my bag. But since I was walking in the crowded Old City today, I don’t rule out the fact that it might have been stolen.

In my wallet, I had my New Jersey driver’s license, my Rutgers ID, my Rothberg International School ID, my debit card, my credit card, a Blockbuster card, a Stop and Shop gift card, my coffee punch card for the cafe at the Academy. I also lost a traveler’s check and a sum of cash.

I was NOT carrying my US Passport and my health insurance card, so those items are still safe.

Here are the steps I took once I realized my wallet was missing:

  • I retraced my steps in the Old City and asked the shopkeepers if they had seen it.
  • I reported the incident to the police—and half in Hebrew!
  • When I got back to the kfar, I called the bank to cancel the cards and had replacements sent to my home in New Jersey.
  • I emailed the Office of Student Activities to ask what I should do for temporary and replacement identification around campus.
  • I emailed my parents to explain the situation, so they could forward my new cards to Jerusalem.

Even though I usually find my wallet when I misplace it, I wasn’t upset in deciding that my wallet was lost for good this time. I think the most upsetting thing was that the wallet itself had sentimental value.

And even though I remained level-headed about losing my wallet, many thoughts still ran through my mind. After I had backtracked the day’s events to the last moment I had my wallet, I began to visit all of the day’s events. I wondered, “Would I have done that if I knew my wallet would end up missing?” I listed.

  • Would I have kept my wallet in my pocket instead of my bag?
  • Would I have carried my bag a different way?
  • Would I have picked this day to randomly buy souvenirs?
  • Would I have spent money on chocolate?
  • Would I have agreed to go to the Old City?
  • Would I have taken out less money at the ATM?
  • Would I have tipped the tour guide?
  • Would I have left the apartment at all this morning?
  • Would I have done my laundry today instead?
  • Would I have just stayed in bed?

I let my mind wander to these places. And when I crossed the idea of staying in bed, I stopped. My mind was going somewhere I knew was ridiculous. I laughed and said, “Oh yeah.”

“This is why I’m so understanding…” So I lost my wallet. It’s okay. You can’t live your life scared that something’s going to happen to you, or that you’re going to make a mistake. Things happen, and you learn from them. There are always solutions to your problems. And if not, there are always ways around them.

Also, I just KNEW there was a reason why I decided to collect the Internet bills late from everyone, and why my roommates were taking their time getting back to me. It looks like I won’t be completely out of money. Things have a funny way of working themselves out.

I consider this a [self-indulgent?] spiritual experience, but I digress.